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Hispanic Republicans Celebrate 33rd Anniversary (english/español)

Just got this in my inbox.

Republican National Hispanic Assembly
Washington, D.C.

July 12, 2007   
Contact: Bettina Inclan
Phone: 202-281-0891
Hispanic Republican Assembly Celebrates 33rd Anniversary

WASHINGTON D.C. - Today the Republican National Hispanic Assembly celebrates its 33rd anniversary. On this day in 1974, Republican National Committee Chairman, George H.W. Bush, created the RNHA. The organization is now an independent membership association and will be celebrating its anniversary at their National Convention in Washington D.C., July 19 -22, 2007.

"For over three decades the Republican Party has been dedicated to Hispanic outreach. Today, the Republican National Hispanic Assembly proudly celebrates is anniversary and rich history of Hispanic involved in politics,' said Chairman Pedro Celis. "Much like our first chairman, Ben Fernandez, who was the first Hispanic to run for U.S. President, our members will continue making strides in politics."

 "Hispanic are not single issue voters, clearly the staying power of the RNHA is proof of this reality. As we move forward into the 2008 election cycle, conservative Hispanics will continue to be a growing force in the political arena," stated Chairman Pedro Celis, Ph.D.

The Republican National Hispanic Assembly (RNHA) will commemorate its anniversary during their National convention. Scheduled to speak at the convention are GOP presidential candidates Mitt Romney and Jim Gilmore; Grover Norquist, President of Americans for Tax Reform; Republican strategist Leslie Sanchez and many more. For a full agenda visit

The official celebration begins with the RNHA 33rd Anniversary Gala Dinner to be held on July 19, 2007 in Washington D.C.'s Mayflower Hotel. The RNHA will be presenting the Ben Fernandez Leadership Award, in honor of the RNHA's first Chairman, Ben Fernandez.

Among the awardees will be two Members of Congress, Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison (TX) and Congressman Lincoln Diaz-Balart (FL) who will be acknowledged for their work increasing Hispanic civic involvement and engaging the Hispanic community.

Ben Fernandez, a Kansas business man, was the son of migrant workers, and in 1974 he became the first Chairman of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly. In 1980 Fernandez ran for President of the United States of America, the first Hispanic to seek to position. He appeared in eighteen Republican primaries and winning nearly a million votes. Fernandez dedicated his life to helping Hispanics become a force in Republican politics.

To send your "Happy Birthday" visit

[continuado en español | Spanish translation below]


Hispanos Republicanos Celebran Su 33 Aniversario

WASHINGTON D.C. – La Asamblea Nacional Hispana Republicana (RNHA, por sus siglas en inglés) celebra hoy su aniversario número 33.  Un día como hoy pero del año 1974, el Comité Nacional Republicano bajo el liderazgo del presidente George H.W. Bush creó la Asamblea Nacional Hispana Republicana (RNHA). Actualmente, el RNHA es una organización independiente y celebrará dicho aniversario durante su Convención Nacional en Washington D.C. desde el 19 al 22 de julio de 2007.

"Por más de tres décadas el Partido Republicano se ha dedicado a acercase a la comunidad latina.  Hoy, la Asamblea Nacional Hispana Republicana (RNHA) celebra su aniversario y una larga historia de Latinos que se han involucrado en el proceso político, como nuestro primer presidente Ben Fernández, quien fuese el primer latino en postularse para presidente de los Estados Unidos, asimismo nuestros miembros continúan destacándose en la política", dijo Pedro Celis, presidente del RNHA.

"Y a medida que nos acercamos a las elecciones presidenciales del 2008, los latinos conservadores continuaremos creciendo en el terreno político" agregó Celis.

La Asamblea Nacional Hispana Republicana (RNHA) celebrará su aniversario número 33 en Washington, DC. desde el 19 al 22 de julio de 2007. Como oradores se encontrarán los candidatos presidenciales republicanos, Mitt Romney y Jim Gilmore.  Además contaremos con la presencia de Grover Norquist,  Presidente de "Americans for Tax Reform", la estratega republicana Leslie Sanchez, entre otros.

La celebración oficial comienza con la Cena de Gala del RNHA, la que tomará lugar en el Mayflower Hotel en Washington, DC. En la  cena se presentará el premio "Ben Fernández Leadership Award," en honor al primer Presidente del RNHA Ben Fernández, quien fuese también el primer latino en postularse como Presidente de los Estado Unidos.

Entre los homenajeados del "Ben Fernandez Leadership Award" se encuentran dos congresistas republicanos, la senadora Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-TX) y el congresista Lincoln Diaz-Balart (R-FL). Ellos serán reconocidos por su gran labor en aumentar la participación cívica de los latinos y por su dedicación en mejorar las vidas de los Hispanos que residen en los Estaodos Unidos. 

Ben Fernández, fue hijo de trabajadores inmigrantes, se convirtió en un hombre de negocios en Kansas y en 1974 llegó a convertirse en el primer Presidente del RNHA. En 1980, Fernández se postuló para presidente de los Estados Unidos, su nombre apareció en dieciocho primarias republicanas y obtuvo casi un millón de votos.  Fernández dedicó su vida para ayudar a más hispanos, como él, a convertirse en una fuerza en la política republicana.

Si desea obtener más información visite nuestra sitio Web a


The mission of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly is to build a membership organization to foster the principles of the Republican Party in the Hispanic community, provide Hispanic Americans with a forum to play an influential role in local, state, and national Party activities, increase the number of Hispanic Republican elected officials, and create and maintain a network of Hispanic Republican leaders.


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