Saturday, April 7

Hyper Connected Hispanics

I found a report on a study on the NSHP.org website, entitled "Conexión Cultural/Connected Culture," that included results from a "poll of more than 2,600 18-55 online Hispanics that consume some Spanish language media weekly." Very interesting data. The original article was published on Hispanicad.com.
Online Hispanics in the U.S. are "media mavens," consuming and adopting media and technology at a higher rate than the general population, according to new research released by Yahoo! Telemundo and Experian Simmons Research. The study found that Hispanics lead the general market in "media meshing" and use of key mobile phone features as they spend more than half of each day engaged with television, Internet and technology gadgets. Overall, Hispanics identified 51 hours of total daily activities, including 14 hours with technology and 13.5 hours with media.
I thought this one line was revealing, and perhaps worth doing further research. It used to be that immigrants wanted to watch more English language media in order to master the language quicker. Perhaps this shows this is no longer the case. I don't have a problem with Spanish language media, but if that is all that Latino immigrants are watching--spanish TV--then it leaves them isolated and disconnected from the mainstream culture. Not that TV has all that much positive values as far as the culture is concerned in my opinion, but thats a whole different story.
Online U.S. Hispanics regularly combine TV and Internet to enrich their media experience and would like to see more online options in Spanish.
Michele Madansky, vice president, global market research, Yahoo! shared his comments on the study.
"In Hispanic households, TV serves as a backdrop to everyday living," said Michele Madansky, vice president, global market research, Yahoo!. "Layered on top of that, Hispanics engage with online content and use both cell phones and the internet to enhance personal connections. Hispanics are heavy users of ubiquitous media and technology because they help them stay connected to what matters most to them – culture, community, friends and family – in both the U.S. and their countries of origin."