Saturday, January 21

High Profile Mexican Politician Launches Blog: Sends English Language Press Release

I received a very interesting press release today that leaves me with more questions than answers. The release reads, "Gabriela Cuevas [Spanish language site], a high-profile member of Mexico City's Legislative Assembly, announced today the launch of her new blog, the first by an individual politician in Mexico: http://gabrielacuevas.blogspot.com".
Cuevas, a former federal congresswoman, says "the blog not only will provide regular information on the capital's Legislative Assembly, but also on the impact of broader social and political developments that will have an impact upon all Mexicans -- inside and outside of Mexico -- as well as ripple effects throughout the Western Hemisphere." The blog will devote particular attention to the implications of Mexico's presidential election in July. As profiled in a recent Wall Street Journal cover story, Cuevas gained national and international prominence at age 26 as a strong critic of Lopez Obrador and his record as mayor on issues such as crime, economic management, corruption, transparency, and class polarization.
Now, there is much to discover about the nature and power of Mexican immigrants in the US when their politicians use the U.S. based Hispanic Press Wire to announce the launch of a web site.

Are blogs gaining in influence in Latin America, and in Mexico in particular? Or, would this blog be specifically meant to target Mexicans or Americans of Mexican descent here in the U.S.?

The press release arrived in my inbox both in English and Spanish, which means that she was interested in targeting an English reading audience, whatever that intended audience is. As always, technology has interesting effects on the way we communicate, and it seems, continues to make the world smaller.

Someone commented to a previous post that Mexico's problems are not our problems. I am starting to wonder if this sort of position makes sense? While I believe we must be a land of law and order, and as such, must secure our borders and get a grip on the problem of illegal immigration, the more I talk to illegal and legal immigrants, the more I hear that there is more to it. I don't know what it is, and I don't mean to come across as softening my position. I am simply attempting to come to grips with the humanity of thousands of individuals that are willing to leave their homeland and their families to come to the U.S. Why? Truly, why? The answer to that question will reveal a lot, and potentially provide ideas for solutions. Perhaps Mexico's problems "should" not be our problems, but the more I think about it, its to late for that--it's already our problem in more ways we would like to admit. The question continues to be "what do we need to do as individuals, and what does the government need to do to take steps towards solutions?"

Isolation is not the answer. Multiculturalism is not the answer. Racism is not the way American's are willing to take. Nationalism seems to me to be just a few steps away from bigotry and racism. So, what are partial solutions? What various pieces can and should be put together to form a comprehensive and complete approach to immigration and border security?

Going back to this young lady, Gabriela Cuevas, I would love to meet her in person and hear her thoughts on solutions on the Mexican side of the border to the U.S. immigration problem, and what she thinks are the connections with Mexico's citizens and the reasons for their exodus to the U.S.