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Ethnic Arrogance and Racism? A True American Has Trouble With Immigrants

It seems I have managed to get the attention of a real direct descendant of an American colonizer--you know, one of those pilgrims pioneer people you read about in the history books. (just being sarcastic) Katie's Dad over at American Kernel doesn't think well of me, and of immigrants, it seems. Truth be told, I was never looking to pick a "fight" (I mean that very loosely), but welcomed the discussion that would open my eyes to a rich history I only know from reading. So, I think I will try to respond to some of the acusations, and clarify my position on some issues.

Perhaps I should be clear on my position on immigration, and some basic related principles:
  1. Immigrants should be encouraged, and even required in many cases, to quickly learn the English language. No bilingual education should happen, except in teaching it as a second language.
  2. Residency and citizenship should require extensive study of American history and mores. Citizenship should be a special privilege granted only to those immigrants that have lived and contributed to our nation for an extensive period of time. I do believe it is to easy for non-US born to gain citizenship these days.
  3. Promoting division (ex. M.E.C.H.A., or NCLR), self-determination, or other such racially based values and divisions, as well as violence (extremist Muslims) should not be tolerated! If you don't like the United States, and its values, then go back to where you came from. This nation is one nation, not because of ethnicity or race, but because of common values and mores.
You see, I think we agree on a lot more than you give me credit. I realize I may be ignoring something, or perhaps mis-communicating some issues. That is why I engage in discourse.

Forgive me for being naive, and perhaps idealistic--I simply don't get people like Katie's Dad. Truth be told, as the son of immigrants, I have felt very much welcome in the United States. I find I have a lot to offer, and truly consider myself an American (no hyphen). I look forward to years of dedicated citizenship. I am not a multiculturalist, or at least not in the traditional definition of the word.

I do believe one's past can ad value, flavor if you would call it, but that an immigrant should set their eyes on their future, and culturally embrace the nation that has welcomed them. I, for example, read history of Cuba. I do so, that I may learn from the mistakes and the good things of my ancestors. If I where to ignore where I come from, how am I to know where I am going. I also choose to NOT embrace values that go against my core moral values. For example, just because abortion is legal in this nation, does mean that I would encourage immigrants to embrace this more. By no means! Instead, Latinos who have a strong Catholic moral upbringing should stand firm on these values, and live them out in conjunction with the American way of life--hard work, liberty, practice of one's faith, and family.

So, read for yourself what he said.
There's nothing wrong with and quite a lot right with the restrictive 1924 immigration policy that gave birth to our "greatest generation" by assuring assimilation, promoting common mores, upholding American values, and, most importantly, doggedly insisting that those who came here shared our common language. You espouse a cleft, multilingual-multicultural society of the sort that has never been successful on this earth.

So, yes Josue, you are soft...just like so many of those who fled Cuba instead of fighting for freedom. I know that's going to seem harsh to you, but having lived as a derogatorily-labeled "Anglo" in Miami, I can testify only to what I experienced first-hand to be fact. There's a lot of talk from you folks, but no action. The whining of those who spring from your easily corruptible culture now falls on increasingly irritated, deaf ears outside Miami-Dade. If one quarter of Miami's "refugees" had the cojones to stay and fight, you wouldn't have Castro to complain about today. That's not to say ya'll wouldn't be jawboning sorrowfully at El Centro Vasco about some other corrupt regime you let come in to replace Fidel's.
Did he just call Cuban exiles cowards, and easily corruptible? Wow. I don't claim to know any better, but I will stand by my core faith that you, sir, do not represent true American values, mores and attitudes. Any culture has its flaws, and the Cuban people have certainly made their share of political mistakes in choosing their leadership.

Am I wrong? Would a true American, a descendant of a colonist or pioneer please write in and comment? Am I way off here?

I should point out, if it where not for immigrants, we would still be 13 colonies, surrounded by French, Spanish, and British kingdom countries. So, Katie's Dad, while your ancestors where the first to establish this great nation--something I owe a debt of gratitude--it is immigrants who made it grow into the nation it is today. It is immigrants who accepted and adopted these foundational values--values they did not invent, but simply built upon--that made our nation what it is today. And yes, I have to say that many crime and evil has been committed by immigrants, but I do not believe these are any worst than the evils that lie within and are committed by every man, regardless of who were his ancestors.

I invite all my readers, immigrant or not, to share your views, perspective, and experiences on immigration. If I am missing something, I need to hear about it.

Tags: Politics, Current Affairs, California, Homeland Security, Mexico, Immigration, ,

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