Thursday, December 1

South African Court Rules for Same-Sex Marriage

From Reuters, more bad news for global human rights with this continued push for special rights for homosexuals.
Reuters
Thursday, December 1, 2005; 10:02 AM

JOHANNESBURG, Dec 1 -- South Africa's top court said on Thursday it was unconstitutional to deny gay people the right to marry, putting it on track to become the first African country to legalise same-sex marriage.

The Constitutional Court told parliament to amend marriage laws to include same-sex partners within the year -- a step that would make South Africa the fifth country in the world to approve gay marriage despite widespread African taboos against homosexuality.
In case you are wondering what does special rights for homosexuals have to do with human rights, here is what Yuri Mantilla, a Bolivian international human-rights expert had to say in reaction to the news that Ake Green – the Swedish pastor accused of committing "hate speech" by commenting on homosexuality during a sermon – was acquitted by that nation's highest court:
"Today we have seen Sweden's Supreme Court uphold true human rights, the right to freedom of religion and freedom of expression. Pastors across that country can now exercise their human rights, without fear of going to prison for transgressing the hate-crimes law used to prosecute Pastor Green. The ruling is consistent with natural law and norms recognized by the international community, which a lower court had violated with the conviction of Pastor Green.

"It is important to understand exactly what was at stake with this case: the defense of fundamental human rights and a precedent that sets a standard regarding the right to religious freedom and the right to freedom of expression. The effort to send Pastor Green to jail is an example of the dangerous implications of pro-homosexual legislation. Today's ruling is a victory for those who believe in true human rights and in the key importance of religious freedom around the world."
Enough said.