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La Raza and Arafat--The New Latino Palestine?

Considering the current situation, and posts by Michelle Malkin, I thought this old post would be relevant. The source of these student activists are the teachers themselves!! I heard for myself at a scholarship presentation banquet a high school teacher recite a violent, racist poem against white people, and calling for violent uprising.

La Raza with Arafat

I found this amazing picture. I don't know if its authentic, but if any of the readers can tell, let me know. This is only a few years old. Whether its real or not, it is this sort of thing that has America concerned about the illegal immigration problem. The mass rallies are not helping.
The myth of Aztlan can best be explained by California's Santa Barbara School District's Chicano Studies textbook, "The Mexican American Heritage" by East Los Angeles high school teacher Carlos Jimenez.

Page 84 shows a redrawn map of Mexico and the United States, showing Mexico with a full one-third more territory, all of it taken back from the United States. On page 107, it says "Latinos are now realizing that the power to control Aztlan may once again be in their hands." Shown are the "repatriated" eight or nine states including Colorado, California, Arizona, Texas, Utah, New Mexico, Oregon and parts of Washington.

According to the school text, Mexico is supposed to regain these territories as they rightly belong to the "mythical" homeland of Aztlan. On page 86, it says "...a free-trade agreement...promises...if Mexico is to allow the U.S. to invest in Mexico...then Mexico should...be allowed to freely export...Mexican labor.

Obviously this would mean a re-evaluation of the border between the two countries as we know it today." Jimenez's Aztlan myth is further amplified at MEChA club meetings held at Santa Barbara Public Schools.The book, paid for by American tax payers, cites no references or footnotes, leaving school children totally dependent on their teacher to separate fact from opinion and political propaganda. The book teaches separatism, victimization, nationalism, completely lacks patriotism towards the United States, and promotes an open border policy. The book is 100 percent editorial -- the opinions of the author.

The history of La Raza Commission Center is one that was conceived and fostered by student political activism. La Raza Commission Center was originally founded by Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlan (M.E.Ch.A.) in 1981. M.E.Ch.A. was born out of the barrios in 1969, at the height of U.S. social unrest as communities of color demanded social and economic justice.

M.E.Ch.A. formulated its direction from the barrios, committed to grass roots organizing and taking actions on behalf of its communities. M.E.Ch.A. Commission changed its name to La Raza Commission Center in 1997 to ensure inclusion amongst all Latinos and breakdown nationality division as we see social and economic issues and concerns in Latino communities related and interconnected.

Although the name of the Commission has changed to La Raza to make all Latinos feel included and to develop a comprehensive understanding of Latin America, its political philosophies remain parallel to M.E.Ch.A. LaRaza now receives federal funds, has the same foundations backing them as b-movement.org.
When I first posted about this, Gonzales was quoted saying it was an honor to be associated with La Raza.
Of course, when you put all of this in light of the list of honored guests La Raza has been promoting in their press releases for [last years] annual conference, it makes you wonder how much time do our dear politicians take to research out organizations that invite them to speak. It is no honor to associate with this organization. Mr. Gonzales, you know better.

Tags: , Politics, border, Terrorism, Homeland Security, MEXICO.

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